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FDA Approves Another Weekly Injectable Drug for Type 2 Diabetes
FRIDAY, Sept. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a new type 2 diabetes drug, Trulicity, on Thursday. Trulicity is part of a class of once-a-week injectable drugs that help manage blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes.

Trulicity Approved for Type 2 Diabetes
FRIDAY, Sept. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Trulicity (dulaglutide) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat type 2 diabetes, which accounts for 90 percent of diabetes cases in the United States.

U.S. Gun Deaths Lowest in Hawaii, Highest in D.C.
FRIDAY, Sept. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to firearm deaths, Hawaii has the fewest gun deaths in the United States, while the District of Columbia has the highest, according to new research.

More Schools Stocking Shots That Counter Serious Allergic Reactions
FRIDAY, Sept. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- More states are passing legislation permitting or requiring schools to stock the medication epinephrine to use for any child having a severe allergic reaction.

Some U.S. Troops May Face Greater Skin Cancer Risk
FRIDAY, Sept. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. military troops deployed to sunny climates may have an increased risk of skin cancer, according to a new study.

Adults Over 45 Not Meeting U.S. Muscle Strengthening Guidelines, Study Says
FRIDAY, Sept. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Although there is mounting evidence that muscle-strength training provides key health benefits, most middle-aged and older adults in the United States don't engage in this type of exercise, according to new research.

Brain Structure Might Help Predict Risky Behavior
FRIDAY, Sept. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Your brain structure could help predict how willing you are to take financial risks, a new study suggests.

Cyberbullying Seems to Ramp Up in Middle School
FRIDAY, Sept. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- As kids transition from elementary to middle school, they are increasingly the targets of cyberbullies, according to a recent study.

Do Greener Neighborhoods Produce Healthier Babies?
FRIDAY, Sept. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women who live in leafy, green neighborhoods are less likely to have premature or low birth weight babies, a new study suggests.

Family Squabbles Can Derail Recovery From Cancer Surgery
THURSDAY, Sept. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer patients burdened by stress and family conflicts before surgery may face a higher risk for complications following their operation, a new study suggests.

Health Highlights: Sept. 19, 2014
Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Health Tip: Beware of Household Chemicals
(HealthDay News) -- Many common household items are dangerous if children get to them, so it's important to know where the danger lies and to keep such items securely stored.

Health Tip: Getting More Whole Grains
(HealthDay News) -- Whole grains are nutrient-rich foods that are full of fiber to help you feel full.

Oral Health in Women of Childbearing Age Needs Improvement
FRIDAY, Sept. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Women of childbearing age in the United States should be encouraged to maintain better oral care and visit the dentist routinely, according to a new study from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Scientists Spot How Bacterial Pneumonia Damages the Heart
FRIDAY, Sept. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors have known that bacterial pneumonia can raise your risk of heart problems, but new research pinpoints why.

Tight Blood Sugar Control Doesn't Prevent Strokes in Diabetics: Study
FRIDAY, Sept. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A six-year study of people with type 2 diabetes found that intensively lowering blood pressure had a long-lasting effect in preventing heart attacks, strokes and deaths. But intensive blood sugar control didn't produce those benefits, the researchers found.

FDA Panel: Limit Testosterone Drug Use
THURSDAY, Sept. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- There is little evidence that testosterone replacement therapy effectively treats normally sagging levels of the hormone in aging American males, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panel said Wednesday.

New Ebola Cases Top 700 in Just One Week, Officials Report
THURSDAY, Sept. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- In a sign that the Ebola outbreak in West Africa is starting to spread faster than ever, the World Health Organization said Thursday that more than 700 new cases of the deadly viral infection were reported in just one week.

Obama Calls for National Plan to Fight Antibiotic Resistance
THURSDAY, Sept. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- President Barack Obama escalated the fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria on Thursday, ordering key federal agencies to pursue a national strategy to deal with the threat.

Mentors May Steer Young People Toward More Rewarding Careers
THURSDAY, Sept. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Teens and young adults who've been mentored may be more likely to get a job that provides them with greater responsibility and independence early on in their career, according to a new study.

ER Waiting Times Vary Significantly, Studies Find
THURSDAY, Sept. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to emergency room waiting times, patients seeking care at larger urban hospitals are likely to spend more time staring down the clock than those seen at smaller or more rural facilities, new research suggests.

Almost Everyone Needs a Flu Shot: CDC
THURSDAY, Sept. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than half of all Americans got a flu shot last year, so U.S. health officials on Thursday urged that everyone 6 months and older get vaccinated for the coming flu season.

Grief Can Weigh on Immune System in Older Folks, Study Says
THURSDAY, Sept. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Older people become more physically vulnerable during bereavement, new research shows.

Health Tip: Losing Weight After Baby
(HealthDay News) -- When you're ready to get back in shape after baby is born, remember that slow and steady is the healthy way to go.

Health Tip: Why Proteins Are Essential
(HealthDay News) -- Proteins are an essential part of your diet, but it's important to choose healthy, lean proteins to keep your body going strong.

One Dose of Antidepressant Changes Brain Connections, Study Says
THURSDAY, Sept. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Just a single dose of a common antidepressant can quickly alter the way brain cells communicate with one another, early research suggests.

Research Shows Possible Neurological Patterns for PTSD Symptoms
THURSDAY, Sept. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Imaging technology has shed new light on how certain symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) manifest in the brain, according to a new study.

Rising Atlantic Ocean Temperatures Could Pose Threat to Reefs
THURSDAY, Sept. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Rising temperatures in the Atlantic Ocean may be allowing certain tropical fish to spread to shallow waters that are becoming warmer, an expansion that could pose a significant threat to coral reefs, ecologists report.

Scientists Studying Sickle Cell Trait
THURSDAY, Sept. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers are trying to learn more about a condition called sickle cell trait, which can cause sudden death in young athletes.

Study: Exposure to Diversity Might Boost Baby's Social Skills
THURSDAY, Sept. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to diverse communities may boost infants' social learning, according to a new study.

Vitamin E, Selenium Supplements Don't Seem to Prevent Cataracts
THURSDAY, Sept. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Daily supplements of selenium or vitamin E don't seem to protect against the development of age-related cataracts among men, a new study indicates.

FDA to Probe Testosterone Therapy Claims, Safety
TUESDAY, Sept. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is focusing on the "Low T" fad, questioning whether the boom in testosterone replacement therapy is helping or harming the health of aging American males.

12 States Now Reporting Severe Respiratory Illness That Targets Kids
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Twelve states now have confirmed cases of Enterovirus D68, the severe respiratory illnesses that may have sickened hundreds of children, U.S. health officials report.

'Biospleen' Suggests New Way to Treat Blood Infection
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists have developed a blood-cleansing device, called the "biospleen," that they say could potentially change the way the blood infection sepsis is treated.

DNA Blood Test Might Identify Status of Prostate Cancer
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A blood test that measures DNA from a prostate cancer tumor could provide doctors with a better assessment of the state of a man's disease, a new study suggests.

Modern Forensics Provides Clues to Death of Richard III
TUESDAY, Sept. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Modern forensic techniques are shedding light on a 500-year-old mystery: Which battlefield injuries might have killed King Richard III, the last English monarch to die in battle?

Researchers Discover How Bacteria Resist Antibiotics in Hospitals
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists have uncovered a key factor to explain why antibiotic-resistant bacteria can thrive in a hospital setting.

Are Migraines in Middle Age Tied to Raised Parkinson's Risk Later?
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Migraines in midlife may be associated with increased odds of developing Parkinson's disease or other movement disorders in later years, new research suggests.

Artificial Sweeteners May Raise Blood Sugar Levels: Study
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetics and dieters who turn to artificial sweeteners to soothe their sweet tooth may not be doing themselves any favors, a new Israeli study suggests.

Europeans Are Descendants of at Least 3 Ancient Human Groups: Study
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Present-day Europeans are the descendants of at least three groups of ancient humans, according to a new study.

Health Highlights: Sept. 17, 2014
Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Health Tip: Avoiding Salmonella From Your Pet
(HealthDay News) -- Just like their owner's cuisine, a pet's food can be contaminated with nasty germs such as salmonella.

Health Tip: Minimize Jet Lag
(HealthDay News) -- It's difficult to eliminate jet lag altogether, but there are things you can do to minimize symptoms of poor sleep, fatigue and difficulty concentrating.

Healthy Lifestyle Changes Linked to Reduced Risk for Dementia
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Managing diabetes, quitting smoking, controlling high blood pressure, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight can reduce the risk for dementia -- even late in life, according to new research.

Major U.S. Food Makers Cut 6.4 Trillion Calories From Products: Report
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Sixteen major food and beverage companies have made good on their pledge to cut calories in their U.S. products, a new report finds.

More Than One Kind of Message May Convince Smokers to Quit, Study Says
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Positive messages about the health benefits of quitting smoking may help some people kick the habit, a new study suggests.

Prenatal Exposure to Chemicals in Plastics Linked to Asthma Risk in Kids
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure in the womb to household chemicals known as phthalates might increase a child's future risk of developing asthma, Columbia University researchers reported in a new study.

PTSD Link to Food Addiction Seen in Report
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Women who have the largest number of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms are almost three times more likely to develop an addiction to food, a new study suggests.

Social Networking Sites Can Help Obese Lose Weight: Study
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Social networking sites can help people lose weight, according to a new study.

Urine Test for HPV Works Well, Analysis Finds
TUESDAY, Sept. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A simple urine test can routinely spot human papillomavirus (HPV), which is linked to the risk of cervical cancer, a new analysis found.