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Ragwitek Approved for Adult Ragweed Allergy
FRIDAY, April 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Ragwitek has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat allergy to short ragweed among adults aged 18 to 65.

Restaurants in Poor Areas Push Unhealthy Foods, Study Finds
FRIDAY, April 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Restaurants near public housing developments tend to offer unhealthy meals, a new study finds.

Certain Sedatives Tied to Breathing Problems in Older COPD Patients
FRIDAY, April 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A group of widely used sedatives increases the risk of serious breathing problems in older people with the lung condition called chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a new study says.

Nurses' Experience Key to Better Patient Care, Study Says
FRIDAY, April 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Patients may get the best care when treated in hospital units staffed by highly experienced nurses, a new study shows.

Appetite, Taste Changes Reported After Weight-Loss Surgery
FRIDAY, April 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- After weight-loss surgery, many patients report changes in appetite, taste and smell, a new study says.

Happy Couples Nestle Together at Night, Survey Finds
FRIDAY, April 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Your sleeping position with your significant other offers clues about the quality of your relationship, according to a new study.

Health Highlights: April 18, 2014
Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Health Tip: Avoid Driving During Flood Warning
(HealthDay News) -- If the National Weather Service in your area has issued a flood warning, experts say you should avoid driving unless absolutely necessary.

Health Tip: If Your Child is Constipated
(HealthDay News) -- Constipation among children often isn't worth worrying about, and resolves on its own. But you shouldn't ignore signs that the problem may be serious, and that your child should be examined by a doctor.

How to Make 'Low-Cal' Menu Options More Palatable
FRIDAY, April 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Many people ignore restaurant foods labeled "low-calorie" because they think they'll be unsatisfying, a new study shows.

More People Worldwide Eating 'Healthy' Fats, Study Finds
FRIDAY, April 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Levels of healthy fats in people's diets worldwide increased over the past two decades, while their intake of harmful fats stayed about the same, a new study finds.

Oil-Swishing Craze: Snake Oil or All-Purpose Remedy?
FRIDAY, April 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Allison Bennett of Palm City, Fla., plans to swish daily. Sloshing coconut oil around her mouth for a quarter of an hour every day will make her teeth whiter, she believes.

Scientists Probe What Makes People Get Their Groove On
FRIDAY, April 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Whether you bust a move, get jiggy with it or just tap a toe or two, something about certain types of popular music makes you want to set your body in motion.

So-Called 'Apple Shape' Not a Risk Factor for Breast Cancer: Study
FRIDAY, April 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Body shape -- whether a woman is wide at the waistline -- is not in itself a risk factor for breast cancer, according to a large new study.

Stress Tied to Worse Allergy Symptoms
FRIDAY, April 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Stress may trigger symptom flare-ups in people with seasonal allergies, a new study suggests.

Suddenly Health Insurance Is Not for Sale
FRIDAY, April 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Darlene Tucker, an independent insurance broker in Scotts Hill, Tenn., says health insurers in her area aren't selling policies year-round anymore.

Most Medical Devices Approved for Kids Only Tested on Adults: Study
THURSDAY, April 17 (HealthDay News) -- Most medical devices approved for use in children are not tested on pediatric patients before they are marketed, a new Harvard study finds.

FDA Approves Under-the-Tongue Hay Fever Pill
THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A novel treatment for the hay fever that plagues millions of Americans every fall was approved Thursday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Salmonella Cases Dip in U.S., But Food Poisoning Rates Remain High
THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- While the United States has seen a decline in the number of Salmonella illnesses in recent years, there's been little progress overall in reducing food poisoning outbreaks, health officials say.

Misdiagnoses Common Among U.S. Outpatients: Review
WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- At least 5 percent of American adults -- 12 million people -- are misdiagnosed in outpatient settings every year, and half of these errors could be harmful, a new study indicates.

Off Season May Not Be Long Enough to Recover From Football 'Hits'
THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- New research shows that the brains of some football players who had the usual head hits associated with the sport, but no concussions, still had signs of mild brain injury six months after the season ended.

FDA Warns Against Procedure for Uterine Fibroids
THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A surgical technique used to grind up uterine growths and remove them through tiny incisions could increase a woman's risk of cancer, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Thursday.

Bacteria May Survive Longer in Contact Lens Solution Than Thought
THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Bacteria that can cause serious eye infections are able to survive longer in contact lens cleaning solution than previously known, a new study finds.

Creative Pursuits Might Boost Your Job Performance
THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Creative activities outside of work may help boost your job performance, a new study suggests.

Health Highlights: April 17, 2014
Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Health Tip: Avoid Diaper Rash
(HealthDay News) -- Diaper rash can be sore and painful for your little one, but there are things you can do to help keep diaper rash at bay.

Health Tip: Avoid Emotional Driving
(HealthDay News) -- Your emotions can hinder your ability to drive safely, so you should keep them in check while you're behind the wheel.

Low Birth Weight, Lack of Breast-Feeding Tied to Inflammation Risk in Adulthood
THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Years later, people who were underweight at birth, and those who were breast-fed only a short time or not at all, could be at increased risk for chronic inflammation and related health problems, a new study suggests.

Mouse Study Reveals New Secrets of Fertilization
THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists report they have demystified how a sperm and egg couple, with new research in mice indicating that egg cells carry a special receptor that allows sperm to attach to and fertilize eggs.

Quarter of Prostate Cancer Patients May Abandon 'Watchful Waiting' Approach
THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors often recommend no treatment at all when a man is diagnosed with prostate cancer, opting instead to keep a close eye on the slow-growing tumor and acting only when it becomes aggressive.

School Bans on Chocolate Milk May Backfire
THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Banning chocolate milk from schools may sound like a good move for kids' health, but efforts to do so haven't turned out that way, a small study found.

Scientists Find New Way to Observe 'Good' Brown Fat
THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- In a possible advance for obesity research, an MRI scan has pinpointed "good" brown fat in a living adult for the first time.

Scientists Map DNA of Deadly Fungus
THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers who sequenced the genome of a deadly fungus say their achievement offers a genetic map for finding weaknesses in the fungus in order to fight it.

Small Childbirth Change Might Help Prevent Iron Deficiency in Babies: Study
THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Changing how newborns are held immediately after birth could boost the use of delayed cord clamping and potentially reduce the number of infants with iron deficiency, according to a new study.

Tonsillectomy May Spur Weight Gain in Kids, But Won't Cause Obesity: Study
THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Some children gain weight after having their tonsils removed, but this weight gain is typically confined to younger, underweight children and doesn't seem to add to obesity rates, a new study finds.

White House: 8 Million People Signed Up for Health Insurance
THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Eight million Americans signed up for private health insurance during the just-concluded first enrollment period under the Affordable Care Act, the White House announced Thursday afternoon.

Leeches Help Save Woman's Ear After Pit Bull Mauling
WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A savage pit bull attack results in the total dismembering of a teenage girl's ear. And though the ear remains fully intact, complications during the initial reattachment process raise the real risk she could lose her ear forever.

Health Tip: Preventing Stairway Falls
(HealthDay News) -- Stairways and falling down seem to go hand-in-hand, but there are things you can do to help keep you on your toes.

Health Tip: Use a Safe Stroller
(HealthDay News) -- Before taking baby for a walk, make sure your stroller is safe and your baby is well protected.

Brain Scans Might Spot Potential for Recovery From Coma
TUESDAY, April 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Brain scans could help identify comatose patients who have the potential to wake up, a new study suggests.

Free Drug Samples for Doctors Might Prove Costly for Patients
WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Dermatologists who receive free drug samples are more likely to give their patients prescriptions for expensive medicines, a new study says.

Apathy Might Signal Brain Shrinkage in Old Age: Study
WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults who show signs of apathy tend to have a smaller brain volume than their peers with more vim and vigor, a new study suggests.

Bleeding Irregularities Common in Menopause, Study Finds
WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Extended and heavy menstrual bleeding during menopause is common, according to a new study.

Cancer 'Vaccine' for Advanced Disease Passes Early Hurdle
WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers report early progress in developing a treatment that might one day help the immune system defend itself against cancer.

Chimps Prefer Firm 'Mattress'
WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Like many people, chimpanzees are picky about their beds, a new study finds.

Crunchy or Smooth? Food's Texture May Sway Perception of Calories
WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Creamy butter or ice cream versus a crunchy granola bar: A new study suggests that the texture of foods influences people's dieting choices.

Diabetes Complication Rates Drop Among U.S. Adults
WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The rates of five serious complications from diabetes -- heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, amputations and death -- have all dropped dramatically since 1990, a new U.S. government study shows.

Experimental Measles Drug Shows Promise in Animal Trials
WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists have successfully tested in animals a new drug that might one day protect people infected with measles from getting sick, according to a new report.

Health Highlights: April 16, 2014
Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Key Brain 'Networks' May Differ in Autism, Study Suggests
WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Differences in brain connectivity may help explain the social impairments common in those who have autism spectrum disorders, new research suggests.