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Athletic Trainers First Line of Treatment for Young Basketballers: Study
WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- High school basketball players in the United States suffered 2.5 million injuries over six seasons and athletic trainers dealt with many of them, a new study finds.

People Seek Out Health Info When Famous Person Dies
WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests.

Early Sign of Kidney Disease Often Ignored, Study Says
WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Too much protein in your urine -- an early sign of kidney disease and a risk factor for heart disease -- often goes undetected and untreated, a new study finds.

Research Shows Ways to Speed Stroke Care
WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Every minute counts for stroke victims who need clot-busting medications quickly to restore blood flow to their brain and prevent further damage.

A Little Wine Might Help Kidneys Stay Healthy
WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- An occasional glass of wine might help keep your kidneys healthy, new research suggests.

Aspirin's Ability to Prevent Colon Cancer May Depend on Your Genes
WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Aspirin seems to halve the risk of colon cancer in people with high levels of a genetic enzyme found in the colon, a new study says.

For Many Men, Impotence Is Treatable Without Drugs
TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A new study reminds men with erectile dysfunction that there's help out there that doesn't require a prescription: diet, exercise and other lifestyle changes.

Gene Therapy May Enhance Cochlear Implants, Animal Study Finds
WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Australian researchers say that gene therapy may one day improve the hearing of people with cochlear implants, allowing them to appreciate music and hear in noisy environments.

Guys: Don't Take Your Y Chromosome for Granted
WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Certain genes on the Y chromosome may have ensured the survival of males, a new study indicates.

Health Highlights: April 23, 2014
Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Health Tip: Signs Your Child Has An Overuse Injury
(HealthDay News) -- Children's bodies are still growing, which can make them more susceptible to overuse injuries as they enjoy sports and physical activity.

Health Tip: When Lifestyle Disrupts Sleep
(HealthDay News) -- Getting enough sleep is essential for good health, but there are lifestyle choices that can get in the way.

People With Kidney Disease Show Higher Cancer Risk in Study
WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults with moderate kidney dysfunction may face a higher risk of developing cancer than those with healthy kidneys, a large study suggests.

People With More Education May Recover Better From Brain Injury
WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that people with more education recover significantly better from serious head injuries.

Pot Smoking May Pose Heart Dangers, Study Suggests
WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 -- Marijuana use might contribute to heart and artery disease among young and middle-aged adults, particularly those already at risk for cardiovascular problems, a small French study reports.

Religious Music a High Note for Older Christians
WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Religious music may improve the mental health of older Christians, a new study finds.

Scientists Study Gene Clues From 115-Year-Old Woman
WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- More than 400 mutations were found in the healthy white blood cells of a 115-year-old woman, according to a new study that may advance what is known about limits of the human life span.

Seniors Who Suffer Mental Declines May Face Earlier Death: Study
WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors with mild symptoms of mental decline may face a higher risk of dying earlier than those with no thinking or memory problems, new Mayo Clinic research suggests.

Two Drugs Work Equally Well for Epileptic Seizures in Kids: Study
TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers comparing two drugs used to treat epileptic seizures in children -- lorazepam (Ativan) and diazepam (Valium) -- found no difference between them in safety or effectiveness.

For Teen Drivers, Unruly Passengers May Be Greater Threat Than Phones
TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Teen drivers distracted by passengers' loud talking and fooling around are more likely to be involved in serious incidents than those distracted by technology such as cell phones, according to a new study.

Certain Type of Brain Malformation May Be Best Left Alone
TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- People with abnormal connections between arteries and veins in the brain may be less likely to suffer a stroke or die if they don't undergo any procedures to correct the problem, new research suggests.

Could Cow Fertilizer Help Spread Antibiotic Resistance?
TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Manure from dairy cows contains a surprisingly high number of antibiotic resistance genes from the animals' gut bacteria, a new study shows.

Eye 'Training' May Help Restore Some Vision Lost to Glaucoma
TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A new computerized eye-training program could upend the long-held belief that glaucoma-related vision loss is irreversible, a small study suggests.

Fear Won't Boost Exam Scores: Study
TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Students can't be scared into doing well on final exams, a new study shows.

Glaucoma Drug May Help Reverse Obesity-Related Vision Loss
TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A drug used to treat glaucoma eye disease can also help people with vision loss linked to obesity, a new study reveals.

Health Highlights: April 22, 2014
Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Health Tip: Signs That You've Become Ill on a Trip
(HealthDay News) -- Few things can ruin a vacation faster than getting sick. But knowing the warning signs can help you recognize the problem and recover faster.

Health Tip: Wash Hands for Food Safety
(HealthDay News) -- Washing hands before and after preparing food is one of the most important ways to help prevent foodborne illness.

Low Blood Sugar May Affect Heartbeat in People With Diabetes
TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Low blood sugar levels -- known as hypoglycemia -- in people with diabetes may cause potentially dangerous changes in heart rate, according to a small new study.

Majority of Americans Support Obamacare Birth Control Provision: Survey
TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 70 percent of Americans support the new health care law's mandated coverage of birth control, a nationwide study finds.

Mental Illness Not a Driving Force Behind Crime: Study
TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows.

New Drugs May Help Prevent Migraines
TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Two experimental drugs may help prevent migraines in people who suffer multiple attacks a month, according to preliminary findings from a pair of clinical trials.

Size of Fetus May Affect Stillbirth Risk
TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Fetuses that are either too small or too large are at increased risk for stillbirth, a large new study says.

Spouse's Sunny Outlook May Be Good for Your Health
TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.

Cyramza Approved for Stomach Cancer
MONDAY, April 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Cyramza (ramucirumab) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat cancer of the stomach or of the area where the esophagus joins the stomach (the gastroesophageal junction).

Start Tornado Preparation Now, Expert Advises
MONDAY, April 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Tornado season is here, and it's important to have an emergency plan in case your home is threatened, an expert says.

Homes Now 'Reservoirs' for Superbug MRSA
MONDAY, April 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- An antibiotic-resistant "superbug," long a problem in health-care settings, is now taking up residence in people's homes, a new U.S. study finds.

Massage May Improve Blood Flow While Easing Muscle Soreness: Study
MONDAY, April 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Massage therapy can help ease sore muscles and improve blood flow for people who are active as well as for those who do not exercise, a small study finds.

No Connection Between Induced Labor, Autism: Obgyns
MONDAY, April 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- There is no connection between inducing labor in childbirth and autism, according to a new statement released Monday by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Too Much Codeine Still Prescribed to U.S. Kids: Study
MONDAY, April 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency room physicians still hand out hundreds of thousands of codeine prescriptions for children every year, despite warnings that kids' responses to codeine vary wildly and the drug can cause an accidental overdose, a new study finds.

Adjusting Your Thermostat Might Improve Your Thinking
MONDAY, April 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- You think best when the air temperature is at a level that makes you feel the most comfortable, new research suggests.

Bowel Illnesses Sometimes Coincide in Kids
MONDAY, April 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Children suffering from irritable bowel syndrome are four times more likely than other kids to have a condition called celiac disease -- an allergy to gluten -- Italian researchers report.

False-Positive Mammograms Don't Deter Women From Future Screening: Study
MONDAY, April 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- False-positive mammograms do increase anxiety, but the feeling is short-lived and most women go on to have breast screening in the future, new research suggests.

Guys, Don't Bother Trying to Sound Sexy
MONDAY, April 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- It's easy for women to sound sexy, but men just don't have what it takes, a new study says.

Health Highlights: April 21, 2014
Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Health Tip: Getting Rid of Dust Mites
(HealthDay News) -- Dust mites can worsen allergies and asthma symptoms. But keeping your home clean can help keep dust mites at bay.

Health Tip: Protect Your Skin
(HealthDay News) -- To help keep your skin looking its best, the Cleveland Clinic offers these suggestions:

Language Problems Common for Kids With ADHD, Study Finds
MONDAY, April 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Children who have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are nearly three times more likely to have language problems than kids without ADHD, according to new research.

Thinking, Memory Problems Tied to Blockages in Neck Artery
MONDAY, April 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Blockage of the carotid artery in the neck appears to increase the odds for memory and thinking problems, a new study indicates.

Too Little Sleep May Add to Teen Health Problems
MONDAY, April 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Many teens from lower- and middle-income homes get too little sleep, potentially adding to the problems of kids already at risk for health issues, new research finds.